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Online Safety Mark assessment, The Catholic School of Saint Gregory the Great, Cheltenham, Gloucestershire

Well, today, I had my Online Safety Accredited Assessor’s ‘hat’ on.  A couple of month’s ago, Ron Richards, Online Safety Consultant at SWGfL, asked me if I would like to pay a visit to The Catholic School of Saint Gregory the Great in the centre of Cheltenham, Gloucestershire, as they were due for an Online Safety Mark re-assessment.  The school achieved an Online Safety Mark three years ago and it was time for them to apply for re-accreditation.  Would they be able to step up to the mark once again?

I received a warm welcome on arrival at the school.  I met briefly with the Head Teacher, Mrs Charlotte Blanch, and the Online Safety Lead, Miss Jo Fowler, to confirm arrangements for the day, before discussing the school’s completed 360 degree safe self review tool’s submission with them and the Computing Lead.  The school had undertaken a detailed review themselves, reaching the accredited level or above in all 28 aspects.  There appeared to be several areas of strength and only a couple of aspects that might be gleaned to be somewhat ‘weaker’.  I had a few questions to ask about points that had been noted, e.g. their Digital Online Safety Group, the taught curriculum, staff and governor training, parent/carer and community engagement, and was keen to discover more about their future plans.  Answers to my questions were forthcoming, positive and enlightening.

It was then time for the real interview stint!  Firstly, I met with a Year 4 teacher, who is also the School Council Lead, and members of the School Council, the Online Safety Champion and his deputy.  The children responded willingly to my questions and a lively discussion ensued.  I was impressed by both their level of digital literacy and awareness of online safety issues.

Next up, were parents/carers and governors.  The school’s communication with parents/carers is very good and an openness was clearly apparent.  Parents/carers admitted that they often learn about aspects of online safety following discussions with their child/children at home, as well as via newsletters and magazines sent from school, links displayed on the school’s website or items shared via their Twitter feed.  They also felt very comfortable approaching the school for support in dealing with online safety issues that might arise beyond the school boundary. Having a former Further Education computing teacher and GCHQ employee on the Governing Body is certainly helpful when reviewing and evaluating online safety policies and practices in school too!

After a short break, it was the turn of the support staff, representing a variety of roles, e.g. teaching partners, School Business Manager, Lead Pastoral Practitioner.  They provided additional information about online safety education and training and the expected procedures in school.  Our discussion also gave them a few ideas for areas for further development, e.g. to consider hosting another of SWGfL’s fantastic online safety briefings and inviting individuals from local schools too.

Being a two form entry school, it was great to have the chance to meet with professionals from a number of year groups, plus the Computing Lead again.  Teachers were clearly aware of online safety issues and how pertinent it is to relay related messages to youngsters that they teach.  Not only do they deliver a specific online safety module, but they team teach the eLIN computing curriculum alongside the Computing Lead, referencing online safety at regular intervals, as well as on an ad hoc basis in the classroom.  It was also pleasing to hear the same procedures being reiterated, suggesting that a consistent approach is maintained throughout the school.

I then spoke with Martin Treacher from Hempsted IT, the school’s out-sourced technical support and the Online Safety Lead once more.  Whilst I have liaised with Martin and his counter-part, Mike Webb, on numerous occasions before, I have never had to interview him formally.  Fortunately, Martin was extremely cooperative and did not put me on the spot! Seeing a familiar face, and knowing the expertise and insight that both him and Mike have between them, reassured me that the school is in very capable hands.

A 30 minute break to review the evidence and reflect upon what I had heard throughout the morning was much appreciated before feeding back to the Senior Leadership Team.  Although more material is available to access online in advance of an assessment today than even just a few years ago, it is always useful to have some time in situ to explore other documentation and seek any necessary clarification from the Online Safety Lead.

Following my lengthy discussions and perusal of relevant material, I was pleased to be able to give very positive feedback to those ‘at the top’.  The school certainly deserved to have their Online Safety Mark renewed and it was a pleasure to present them with a certificate of attainment.  I hope that they are able to truly fulfill their ‘next steps’ in the very near future and look forward to reading/hearing about their successes.  Remember to ‘get tweeting’!

It was a pleasure to present the Head Teacher, Mrs Charlotte Blanch, and Online Safety Lead, Miss Jo Fowler, with their new Online Safety Mark.

 

 

 

CPD workshop: Let’s go on an awesome, Arctic adventure!

The Gloucester Farmers’ Club was the venue for our CPD workshop, entitled ‘Let’s go on an awesome, Arctic adventure!’, and what an ideal one it was too!  We had a well-equipped room with lots of space to spread out, were supplied with plentiful tea and coffee (supplemented with some home-baked goodies, chocolate fingers and a tub of Heroes that I brought along with me), were surrounded by stunning gardens and had a large, free car park at our disposable. Gill Johnson, from Wicked Weather Watch, also joined us … it was great to have her presence and hear about some of the charity’s exciting developments ahead.  I will certainly consider using this venue again for further CPD events.

The session began with a formal welcome and introductions, before the aims and format of the workshop were outlined.  I prompted delegates to think and become involved from the onset by challenging them to a quick starter activity … to review their current school curriculum and identify any links to the Arctic, either at Key Stage 1 or Key Stage 2, or both, depending on whether they were based at an infant, junior, primary, middle or special school.  Participants then shared what they had written down, which also gave me an insight into termly themes covered within their establishments.  As several were non-specialists, new to the Geography/Humanities Subject Leader role or recent entrants to the profession, I dedicated a significant amount of time to ‘unpicking’ the National Curriculum for geography and highlighting the many, possible links to the Arctic region.  I also displayed the progression framework that the Geographical Association produced when the new National Curriculum was launched.  This lists the expectations of pupils at 7, 9, 11, 14 and 16 years old and is a useful reference when planning.

Next, I accessed Wicked Weather Watch’s website and provided an overview of the new Key Stage 2 scheme of work and its accompanying resources that has been produced and tested in local primary schools.  Whilst this is, perhaps, best suited to those in Years 5 and 6, it can easily be utilised with both younger and older students … there is a huge amount of content to ‘cherry-pick’ from.  We looked at the Polar Ocean Challenge’s website briefly and Gill added some information about Sir David Hempleman-Adam’s next adventure … he is off to Greenland with Northabout and crew this coming June and is integrating a land expedition to one of the North Poles. I relayed information about a Global Learning Programme, Key Stage 2 to Key Stage 3 transition project between four schools and relating to the Arctic that I had steered a couple of weeks ago too.

After a brief refreshment break, delegates were given time to explore a number of recommended web-links, browse resources that I had brought along with me, network, seek school-specific advice and ask any questions that they had.  Being a relatively small group, it was lovely to be able to spend some time with individuals … an effective means of seeing and hearing what goes on in the great variety of schools that we have, both within the county and beyond.

Spending one-on-one time with individuals.

Sharing Wicked Weather Watch’s new Key Stage 2 scheme of work and accompanying resources. An opportunity to deliver some high-quality geography, with many cross-curricular links incorporated.

Providing further suggestions to ensure specific school and individual interests and needs are met.

Participants appreciated having the time to explore resources and web-links at their leisure.

Finally, participants were given a set of footprints and asked to use these to record their next steps once they left the room at lunch-time.  I advised them to start with the big toes and work outwards and stressed that each step could be as simple or complex as they liked.  It was very encouraging to see that all identified a step for each toe.  Our subsequent discussion was lively and clearly reinforced how individuals had been enthused by the morning’s session.

Participants were asked to outline their next steps once they left the room today. They were encouraged to work outwards from the big toes and see how far they could reach. Steps could be as simple or complex as they wished.

Rising to my challenge well!

This proved to be a very thought-provoking exercise, and one that I will certainly repeat again.

Quite a few next steps identified … a productive morning!

Delegates were requested to use the blank postcards left on their tables to offer feedback about the workshop.  They were advised to consider what went well (WWW) and even better if (EBI), as well as noting any additional resources that they would like Wicked Weather Watch to generate.

Some of their concluding comments can be read below:








‘Thank you.  It was a great morning.  I feel very inspired.’

‘Many thanks for this morning’s CPD event.  It was very beneficial.’

All in all, not a great money spinner for me, but extremely worthwhile knowing that I have supported and truly inspired many individuals.  Hopefully, some high-quality geography will be taking place in local schools before too long!

Don’t miss this new scheme of work and associated resources from Wicked Weather Watch (WWW)!

After much time and effort, both from myself and those at Wicked Weather Watch, it is great to see the recently devised Key Stage 2 scheme of work and its associated resources available for educational professionals to download free of charge (see http://wickedweatherwatch.org.uk/ for further details).

The scheme of work, entitled ‘Lets’ go on an awesome Arctic adventure‘, enables teachers and pupils to explore this incredible region via an enquiry-based approach and from a cross-curricular perspective.  It has been trialed by teachers and pupils in schools, as well as used in conjunction with a Global Learning Programme, Key Stage 2 to Key Stage 3 transition project (see http://espley.creativeblogs.net/2017/03/03/global-learning-programme-glp-ks2-ks3-transition-project-cirencester-deer-park-school-cdps-gloucestershire/ for a detailed report of the day), and has been well received to date.  There is enough material for a termly topic, or you can simply choose to focus on one particular aspect, such as the pressing issue of climate change.  You may even be lucky enough to receive a visit from a real, modern-day explorer – either a crew member from the latest Polar Ocean Challenge (http://polarocean.co.uk/) or, perhaps, Sir David Hempleman-Adams himself?

Do visit their website to discover more!